Sunday, January 22, 2012

Painting yellow!

I've fallen behind on my blogging, but funny enough not my painting. I plan on getting photos of everything painted and put in on the static army pages (I.e. Imperial Fists and Skaven, and probably a misc as well) and start chronicle things from here on.

I've been trying out Vallejo's white airbrush able primer. It works really well, with one exception, tape can rip it off (with disastrous effects on the valkyrie I'm painting!) back to the plastic. I would love to get hold of an airbrush able primer that really bit into the plastic (and resin) since I never ever anticipate trying to strip any paint off anyways (I just paint something else from my big pile of plastic crack:)).

So I started out with the white primer, then I pre shaded with Tausept Ochre. I didn't really clean up the Tausept well which I will do next time around. Apart from that minor snafu adding on the Golden Yellow  afterwards went really well. The Tausept turned out to be a bit orange in shade which actually looked quite nice. See for yourself:)


45 degree hazard stripes. 15mm "wide" (I measured 15mm between the dots on the top and bottom and then drew lines between them, they aren't actually 15mm wide per se). I really need to find a better tape, this type pulls off the paint (even when careful!). I didn't have it on nearly as long as on the Valkyrie, which probably saved me some headache, plus the pieces that happen to peal off (small) ended up on spots I intended to paint other colors anyways.


After airbrushing black. Looks pretty cool already :)


With bolt gun painted on. Going to paint the wings/skull red and give the metal a thing wash of badab black, followed by a devlan mud on the bottom quarter. Then some nicks in mithril silver and it should be off to battle we go. I do have a little experiment I'm thinking of though for the back of it. Going to paint in some "light" from the headlights on the tank on the back of the shield (the little flaps are there to represent that you can open them to let the light through). Going for light blue xenon light:)


So, how's that for painting yellow?

10 comments:

  1. That there's some tasty lookin' yeller. Good job!

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    1. Thanks Mik! Putting a yellow army on the table tends to draw comments quickly btw:)

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  2. Looks good mate. I think the pre-shading looks great and the shield will come up trumps when the detailing is finished.

    You mention weathering the metallics but what about the black and yellow? Any plans to chip/wear away some of the stripes?

    I think from memory the FW Masterclass book talks about sealing with a coat of varnish between layers to help stop prior layers lifting.

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  3. I've been thinking long and hard about a good paint chip/damage scheme for yellow. Just metal tends to be a bit hard to notice and the good old black then metal a bit too big and noticeable. Same with a color with an embossed look. I want bigger rips on the shield as it would have pushed rubble away but at the same time it's a bad piece to experiment on as fixing the paint is hard (color matching airbrushed colors is difficult).

    So in other words, examples and ideas needed :)

    Great idea with the coat! I will spray some on next time for sure. Now I just have to figure out if there are some good airbrushable ones out there (living in Minnesota makes it hard to use spray bottles. Wish I had access to an indoor facility where I could do my spraying that also had good ventilation.

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  4. I found this with a quick google search:

    http://www.scalemodelguide.com/guide/painting/salt-weathering/

    Although I think you're a bit late into the process for using the salt method, using the corner of a piece of blister foam and sponging it on might still do the trick - ad its more for the colour idea - ie the brown hue for the chips.

    My thoughts would be to sponge on yellow over the black first trying to match the colour of the primary coat as much as possible, and then maybe use something like dark flesh or scorched brown to chip the yellow and then come back with a spot of bleached bone on the bottom edges.

    Plus you could overlay some metallic for the really worn areas.

    I'm really tempted to try the salt method myself as the FW Masterclass has a decent walk through and there are plenty of tutorials out there on it. Like I said, a bit late in the game for this one, but something to keep in mind if you do more.

    As to spray varnishes, I have a couple of brands:

    Microscale Industries (who do the decal softener/setting agents) do a Micro Flat, Gloss and Satin range of brush on (and air brushable) acrylic varnishes which can be cleaned up with water.

    I also have some Vallejo Matte Varnish - again for use in an airbrush/brush on.

    I've used the Microscale flat theough the brush and it seemed to work alright, but haven't yet tested the others.

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    1. I like using the sponge, as I want worn rather than big holes, but it often ends up being too subtle. I've got a complicated relationship with weathering/damage on minis:) Good with some outside input though, have to think things through. Not going to get a second chance to paint the shield (well, I will, but I won't repaint the first:)).

      I should try it out on a test piece! See what works. Try a few different ways.

      I think that the salt trick seems to work best for stuff like rust, but maybe metal could work too. I need an Ork vehicle to try it out on:)

      Good suggestions on the varnish. Might just see if I can't pick up a Vallejo one (not keen on ordering little things online).

      I could go for tausept as that's my shading color. Must try things out!

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  5. Very nice!

    I've been trying to use my airbrush more, but it has been frustrating. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong, but I get very inconsistent results. I have a single action, siphon feed brush and a decent compressor. Even when I water the paint down a ton, it still clogs and sputters. I am getting a better airbrush soon, and I plan on trying some better paint too, so we'll see if that fixes things.

    As for your tape problem, I've heard very good things about Vallejo's masking tape. I haven't tried it myself, but I figure I'd pass along the recommendation.

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    1. Make sure the paint isn't clumped up. Also consider using airbrush medium or windex to thin with. Also play with the pressure and go lightly on the trigger. I've noticed that my airbrush clogs when I run too much paint through it. And never start up the air with the mini in front of the airbrush, usually gives you a splash otherwise :)

      Couldn't find any info on their tape on their webpage :( I'm using standard painters tape now, which isn't perfect. I would need something more soft so I can push it down over shapes and such.

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  6. Nice yellow but I'm a lot more intrigued by the masking tape you used to do the warning strips.

    I dont want to have your experience with it. but the stripes make it worth it. congratulation on your post.

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  7. Hi Woroxon :)

    I would follow the tip above and use some form of varnish before actually putting any tape on.

    I'm using "normal" boring painters tape. Stuff you'd use to paint the inside walls of your house. It does "bleed" a bit though, so it is not perfect:/ It's especially bad if you use a brush rather than an airbrush. I'm slowly looking into better tapes.

    If you look at my old posts you should see me using tapes to do the wings of a valkyrie (wings on wings:)).

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